Bruce Lee Films and Television




Search Site



Main Menu


Advertisers



eNewsletter

To subscribe to our enewsletter, please enter your email address in the box below and click the "Subscribe" button.


Note: You may easily remove yourself from the newsletter list at any time by following the instructions included with every mailing.


Bruce Lee Movies


Bruce Lee's Movie Career

Lee had his first role as a baby who was carried onto the stage. By the time he was 18, he had appeared in twenty films.

In 1969, Lee made his first major film appearance in Marlowe. In the film, Lee's henchman character is hired to intimidate private detective Philip Marlowe (played by James Garner) by smashing up his office with leaping kicks and flashing punches, only to later accidentally jump off a tall building while trying to kick Marlowe off. In 1971, Lee appeared in four episodes of the television series Longstreet as the martial arts instructor of the title character Mike Longstreet (played by James Franciscus). Bruce would later pitch a television series of his own tentatively titled The Warrior. Allegedly, Lee's concept was retooled and renamed Kung Fu, but if so, Warner Bros. gave Lee no credit. The role of the Shaolin monk in the Wild West, known to have been coveted by Bruce, was awarded to non-martial artist David Carradine, purportedly because of the studio's belief that a Chinese leading man would not be embraced by the American public.
 
Bruce Lee - Chuck Norris
 

 
Bruce Lee Fight Scenes
 
 


Bruce Lee Vs
Chuck Norris


Bruce Lee vs
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar


Bruce Lee Vs
Jackie Chan


Enter the Dragon
Bruce Lee vs
Robert Wall


Fist of Fury
Bruce Lee vs
Japanese School


The Big Boss
Bruce Lee and
The Final Big Fight

     
 
 
 
Not happy with his supporting roles in the U.S., Lee returned to Hong Kong and was offered a film contract by legendary director Raymond Chow and his production company Golden Harvest. Lee played his first leading role in The Big Boss (1971) which proved an enormous box office success across Asia and catapulted him to stardom. He soon followed up his success with two more huge box office successes: Fist of Fury (1972) and Way of the Dragon (1972). For Way of the Dragon, he took complete control of the film's production as the writer, director, star, and choreographer of the fight scenes. In 1964, at a demonstration in Long Beach, California, Lee had met karate champion Chuck Norris. In Way of the Dragon Lee introduced Norris to moviegoers as his opponent in the final death fight at the Colosseum in Rome, today considered one of Lee's most legendary fight scenes.
  

    

In 1973, Lee played the lead role in Enter the Dragon (1973), his first film to be produced jointly by Golden Harvest and Warner Bros. This film would skyrocket Lee to fame in the U.S. and Europe. However, only a few months after the film's completion and three weeks before its release, the supremely fit Lee mysteriously died. Enter the Dragon would go on to become one of the year's highest grossing films and cemented Lee as a martial arts legend. It was made for US$850,000 in 1973. To date, Enter the Dragon has grossed over $200 million worldwide. The movie sparked a brief fad in the martial-arts epitomized in songs like "Kung Fu Fighting" and TV shows like Kung Fu.


Robert Clouse, the director of Enter the Dragon, attempted to finish Lee's incomplete film Game of Death which Lee was to also write and direct. Lee had shot over forty minutes of footage for Game of Death before shooting was stopped to allow him to work on Enter the Dragon. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, a student of Bruce Lee, also appeared in the film, which culminates in Lee's character, Billy Lo (clad in the now-famous yellow track suit) taking on the 7'2" basketball player in a climactic fight scene. In a controversial move, Robert Clouse finished the film using a Bruce Lee look-alike and archive footage of Lee from his other films and released it in 1978 with a new storyline and cast. However, the cobbled-together film contained only 15 minutes of actual footage of Lee while the rest had a Lee lookalike, Tai Chung Kim, and Yuen Biao as stunt doubles. The unused footage Lee had filmed was recovered 22 years later and included in the Bruce Lee documentary Bruce Lee: A Warrior's Journey.
 
Bruce Lee Major Films


The Big Boss (1971) (US title:Fists of Fury)
Fist of Fury (1972) (US title:The Chinese Connection)
Way of the Dragon (1972) (US titles:Return of the Dragon, Revenge of the Dragon)
Enter the Dragon (1973)
Game of Death (1978)

 






2008-2010 BruceLeeFilms.com, All Rights Reserved.


Powered By FlexCMS